Know Why You Do What You Do

Do you know why you do what you do? Many of us don’t. Simon Sinek says that many people and companies don’t know their “why” and yet it is crucial to their success.

Sinek is known for his TED talk where he describes The Golden Circle. Sinek says the great leaders and companies of the world all think, act, and speak the same. And it’s the complete opposite from everyone else. He says everyone knows “what” they do. Some know “how” they do it. But very few people or organizations know “why” they do what they do. “Why?” is the cause or purpose or belief behind “what” you do.

Apple is his example. If they did things like everyone else their marketing campaign would go something like this: “We make great computers. They are beautifully designed, simple to use and user friendly. Want to buy one?”

But they don’t approach their company that way. They begin with the “why?”

Everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo. We believe in thinking differently. The way we challenge the status quo is by making our products beautifully designed, simple to use and user friendly. We just happen to make great computers. Want to buy one?

Sinek says people don’t buy what you do but why you do it. It’s an amazing insight. But it’s also a little scary since most of us don’t know why we do what we do. And yet the early believers knew the “why” behind the “how” and “what” they did. And “what” they did was community.

…they devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers … And all who believed were together and had all things in common. … And day by day, attending the temple together and breaking bread in their homes… (Acts 2:42-47)

If we could travel back through time and sit down in their homes and ask them why they were meeting together they would answer: Everything we do we believe in following Jesus’ way of life.

Jesus is why they did anything they did. They were following the way of Jesus. And one of the things they did was devote themselves to the fellowship. “Devote” means to “adhere to.” If you’ve ever stepped on some gum and found your shoe stuck to the ground, you understand the word for “devote.” Your shoe and the pavement are “glued” or “stuck together.”

The early Christians were stuck together too. Why? Because they saw Jesus stick with them. When they were fun to be around, he stuck with them. When they irritated him, he stuck with them. When they were slow to understand, he stuck with them. Jesus is a model of devotion.

And he wants us to be too. In John 13:35 he says “By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” When the church loves those in the church, those outside the church will notice. Why? Because Jesus is love.

Jesus is our “why.” Devotion is our “how.” Loving each other is our “what.” And others notice how we love each other. Jesus said in John 13 that this is how people will know we are his disciple, i.e., how we “love one another.”

We do what he would do in the way he would do it. And Jesus would challenge the status quo of our isolated world and create community. Our Golden Circle might sound something like this:

Everything we do, we believe in following Jesus. The way we follow Jesus is by devoting ourselves. We devote ourselves to teaching and fellowship and the breaking of bread and to prayers, to being together and having all things in common. We just happen to enjoy community too.

Know your “why” and you’ll know “how” to do your “what.” You might even change the world along the way.

Question: How aware are you of your “why” for the things you do?

 

 

 

 

How to Increase Your Love of God and People

You’ve seen art lovers. They go to museums on their time off. They buy paintings for their home and office.

You’ve seen sports lovers. They watch every college game on the weekend. They buy racquets and equipment and hit the courts three nights a week. They play hoops with other aging bodies even when it hurts.

You’ve seen food lovers. They take cooking classes. They purchase the best utensils for their kitchen. The art lover sees their presentation which resembles a masterpiece and asks to buy it for their home or office.

You know the principle even if you have never stated it: you are what you love. Each one of us becomes something that we love. And we are first what we want.

So says James Smith in his book, You are What You Love. Makes sense, doesn’t it? People know Jay Leno loves cars because Jay Leno owns around 286 vehicles. And people know you by what you love. And they know what you love because you have ordered your life around what you want.

That’s why Jesus asks the disciples who are following him, “What do you want?” He doesn’t ask “What do you believe?” or “What do you know?” Jesus wants to know “What do you want?” This is an important question—maybe “the” question—because as Smith writes, “You are what you love because you live toward what you want.”

The problem we face is that in following Jesus we often find we have wanted something other than him first. And so we have lived towards those things that occupy a higher place in our lives. We need our wants to be transformed.

It’s possible. One way we try to do this is by learning. We study. We attend Bible class, worship and hear sermons, we take online studies and read the Bible more and read more books. There’s nothing wrong with learning. At its basic definition a “learner” is what a “disciple” is: someone who learns to live the life Jesus would live if he were in our shoes.

What we often miss in our era is we think learning has to do with only the brain. So we try to cram more knowledge in it. And then we learn that Jesus says the greatest commandment is to “love” and we realize we have not become good at loving.

Biblical learning goes past head knowledge alone. Knowledge has a sidekick named Behavior. Classically, behavior can be formed in two ways. The first is imitation. Our culture values originality but the Bible values imitation. Jesus said “follow me.” Paul said, “Imitate me as I imitate Christ.”

Want to learn to love? Find people who love God well and love people well and spend time with them. Watch them. Ask questions. Invite input. Imitate them as they imitate God.

Then practice. Move what you are learning to your behavior. We listen to a virtuoso violinist and we marvel at how fluidly and flawlessly she plays. But what we don’t see is that because she loves the sound a violin makes she has spent hours and hours practicing. The Apostle Paul says our practice takes place in Christian worship. It happens when the church assembles for worship of God. And it happens when the church assembled dismisses into the world.

Jesus asked those disciples “What do you want?” They didn’t really know so they followed him. And what they saw they imitated. What Jesus did they practiced. Things they thought they wanted most they learned they needed least. What they wanted most was God. And so they learned to love him first.

This year may you love God first. Imitate God lovers you can find. Practice.

Before long people will look at you and say “That person is a God lover.”

Question: How well are you known as a “God Lover?” Who will you imitate and how will you practice this year?

Make 2017 Your Year of Transformation

When my boys were young they loved to watch The Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers. I’d watch it with them because I loved it…I mean…I wanted to be a good dad and spend quality time with them.

We watched each episode with anticipation because we knew the script. At some point these ordinary teenagers would be faced with an enemy. They would speak the words, “It’s morphin’ time!” and immediately transform into martial arts super heroes. We’d say the words along with them. But, other than in our imaginations, we did not change.

Wouldn’t it be nice if transformation were that easy? But you know as well as I from experience it seldom is. And yet, transformation is the crucial issue in your spiritual life today. We are to take it seriously because the New Testament writers took it seriously.

Paul uses the word “morphoo” in his writing. For example, Paul urges “…be transformed by the renewing of your minds.”  Paul tells the churches of Galatia that he is in the pains of childbirth until “Christ is formed in you.”  He tells the Corinthian church that we are being “transformed” from one degree of glory to the next.  The word there is metamorphoo, from which we get our word metamorphosis.

When a person is following in the way of Jesus, transformation is expected to happen. John Ortberg has written in his book The Life You’ve Always Wanted that when we follow Jesus but don’t change, two bad things can happen. One thing that can happen is that we just give up on change. A person settles for the idea that they have done the minimal requirement necessary for “getting into heaven” but has given up on the hope of “heaven getting into them.”

The second thing that can happen is a person settles for pseudo-transformation. This occurs when a person or group focuses on external markers to give them some assurance they are different than those who are not following Jesus. James Dunn talks about these boundary markers in his commentary on Romans where he says that the rabbinical writings of the day talked a lot about circumcision, the Sabbath, and dietary laws. He says that if you were to ask a rabbi in the first century what the core of the Law was, they would quickly recite the Shema: “Hear O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One. And you shall love the Lord with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might.”

Why then did they focus in their writings on circumcision, the Sabbath, and dietary laws? The answer is these were external boundary markers for who was in and who was out. It still happens today. Christians are often known for what they “don’t” do. Those are boundary markers. Even churches have them: “Spirit-filled, non-denominational, contemporary music vs. traditional music, a real discipling church, a real Bible-based church.” It happens whether we realize it or not. Those are boundary markers.  All groups have them.

But Jesus came along and had a different way of identifying.  “Love God.  Love people,” he said.  Paul said the same thing: “I might have a lot of boundary markers.  But if I don’t have love, I’m nothing.”  John agreed.  “Whoever loves is born of God and knows God.  Whoever does not love does not know God.”

If you go back and look at the conflicts Jesus had with the religious leaders, they mostly had to do with circumcision, dietary laws, or the Sabbath.  The Pharisees were concerned about the boundary markers.  But for Jesus the key question was their orientation. Were they moving in the direction of loving God and loving people?  That’s why he scandalized people by saying the tax collectors and prostitutes were in the kingdom ahead of the religious leaders.  His boundary marker was the heart, and it was a transformed heart.

Want real transformation this year? Then Paul says we need to go into training like athletes (1 Corinthians 9:24) because there is a huge difference between “trying” and “training.” If I “tried” to run a marathon tomorrow, I might make a few miles before having to stop. But if I “trained” for a marathon, there’s a good chance I would see the finish line.

Start training today. Find a spiritual gym, a church, who can help you train both spiritually and emotionally towards maturity. And see if by the end of the year you have moved further in the direction of loving God and people.

Go ahead and say it. I know you want to. “It’s morphin’ time!”

Question: What training do you need to begin to be the person you want to be?

Your Best Year Yet

We’re already into the New Year. Four days have already been marked off. And if you’re not careful you’ll be staring 2018 in the eyes and wonder, “What happened?”

Our years have a way of passing quickly. And the older one gets the faster they seem to fly by. That’s because we have more time that we have experienced. So one year to an 80-year-old seems shorter than a year does to a 5-year-old. (Remember how summers seemed to last forever when you were in elementary school but by high school it felt like you just got started and then it was time to hit the books again? Yeah, I thought you’d agree.)

So before this year takes control of you why don’t you take control of it? Here are a few steps that can make this your best year yet.

Decide what you want to say “yes” to. One of the regrets people have is what they did not do or people they did not spend enough time with or things they did not experience. In many instances the reason is they never decided they would give themselves permission to say “yes” to those things.

So right now take some time to answer the question: What do you want to say “yes” to this year? You may want to think in three basic categories I plan around each year:

  • Family. At the end of my life I cannot imagine ever thinking I had spent too much time with family. It seems with life demands there is never enough time. But if we plan to say “yes” to family we will plan time for family. Maybe it’s a bi-weekly date night with your spouse. Or a monthly outing with each of your children, separately, just to let them know they have your undivided attention. It may be planning trips to see extended family.
  • Faith. Faith is critical to my life, so each year I want to say “yes” to the things that will nurture and build my faith. Things like Bible reading and study, gathering with others for worship, investing myself in a few with whom we can mutually encourage each other. This takes time. But if you believe the benefits are eternal as I do, you’ll want to prioritize these things over other things that may be short lived.
  • Fitness. In order to give my best in any of the things I say “yes” to I know I need to do my best at staying fit. So I say “yes” to exercise and eating well. Moderation in everything is important. A doctor friend of ours from years back would say “the body is designed to handle just about anything you put into it, as long as you don’t put too much.” Mental fitness is part of the goal too, so how will you improve there this year? Are there books to read? Courses to take? Webinars to join? You have time to improve your fitness this year. You just have to say “yes” to it.

Once you have your “yes” list in hand you then need to decide what and/or who to say “no” to. You have time wasters in your life and you probably know what they are: television, gaming, social media, surfing the web. Feel free to add to the list. At the end of the day do these add quality to your life? Maybe some. But definitely not at the expense of the “yes’s” you just listed. You have to say “no” to these and keep them in balance.

There are people you may have to say “no” to also. If your boundaries are shaky you will let other people suck up your time. You will allow them to get you involved in things that keep you from your “yes” list. You will allow them to pull you into their problems. And before you know it a year has gone by and you have not said “yes” to many things you intended to.

Understand, your “yes” list is not an excuse to never help someone else. But it is your guide to knowing what to say “yes” and what to say “no” to.

Then calendar your “yes” list. Look at who you will spend time with and what you will spend time doing. Mark out most of this on your calendar for the year. If you said “yes” to bi-weekly dates with your spouse go ahead right now and put them on the calendar. For the most part stick to it. Then when someone asks you to join them for another event you can honestly say, “Thank you, but I already have a commitment on that date.” Your spouse will thank you for it. (Unless they were offering you tickets to go with them to a U2 concert. Then you say, “I think I can rearrange my schedule to make that work!”)

If you don’t fill your calendar, someone else or something else will.

And lastly, do your best when you are at your best.  For many people that best time is in the morning. Some studies indicate that morning people accomplish more (if you are a night owl don’t yell at me…I’m probably in bed so I can get up early). You can read some findings here. But at least in my personal experience I have found I accomplish more earlier in the day than later.

Whenever you are most productive, that’s when you need to produce. Do your best when you are at your best.

Get started with these steps and you can have your best year yet.

Question: How will you make this year your best year yet?